Friday, 6 April 2012

Fuck - Day 6 of A-Z

Yes. I did it. I went there. I'm a bad man for doing so. But why? Basically, in my (dark) fantasy story 'A Matter of the Heart', I've had occasion to write a scene where characters cuss, but I was reluctant to resort to 'modern' swearing for fear of breaking the moment. I know in George R.R. Martin's, 'Game of Thrones', he throws in the whole gamut of swear words. As easy as it is on the ears to hear in the television adaptation of his story, due to its everyday commonplace usage, I'm very reluctant to go that route; for a modern day setting as in my Three Minute Friday Short Story 'Old Farm', I used the f-bomb, but it was applicable for the contemporary setting.

WARNING - DO NOT VIEW THIS VIDEO IN THE PRESENCE OF CHILDREN, ESPECIALLY WITH SPEAKERS TURNED ON. USE HEADPHONES - STRONG LANGUAGE CONTAINED WITHIN.




But for a more informative and historical background exploration of this versatile word, I sincerely urge you to visit this Wikipedia link which tells everything you wanted to know about the F-word. Normally I skim through a Wikipedia page, but this one I had to read from top to bottom. It really is a great read and puts to bed some of those myths regarding the origins of the F-word. I hope you enjoy :)

9 comments:

  1. I was given a book about the origin of words, when I was in 7th grade. I think it's called "I hear America talking". I brought it to school to show my friends. It's huge. And 35 years later, the book automatically opens to the "Fuck" entry. lol

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    1. hehehe... I'm saying nothing :x

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  2. I love looking into the history of words, how they've changed, what they originally meant and the progression to what they've come to mean. Thanks for sharing!

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  3. Bad, bad Mark :)

    Interesting post as well. C-word also has some fascinating history attached to it.

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    1. I know it might seem a cop-out leaving it to the Wikipedia article, but I thought, 'why copy from that in snippets when the guys 'n' gals can have the entire thing?'. As I said in opening, in writing my story, I don't wish to slip into modern language if it can be helped.

      As a point in case, I have a freebie swords'n'sorcery book on my iPad I thought I would read for light entertainment. Curse the author. He slips in American colloquialisms on a regular basis, which kills the story for me to the point of considering deleting the book.

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  4. Haha nice post! I discovered many of the different uses of this word through my Norwegian dictionary which lists them all. :D

    Nikki – inspire nordic

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    1. Really! Now my image of you as a sweet young lady are dashed.

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  5. I'll have to check that page out! Figuring out what swear words to use and when to use them can be tricky, especially if the time is different. Different curses in the past...different in the future?

    Shannon at The Warrior Muse, co-host of the 2012 #atozchallenge! Twitter: @AprilA2Z

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  6. It is one of the most versatile words in the language. I heard once that it came from the Middle Ages when in Britain you had to apply to the king to have children. Then the acronym FUCK was painted on the door to your house while you were "at it" which stood for Fornication Under Consent of the King. I'm sure that this is probably the stuff of legend, but it's a good story all the same.

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